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For access to the full 2015 IRC manual: CLICK HERE

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Modified Bitumen

Modified Bitumen

Modified Bitumen

EPDM Roofing

EPDM Roofing

EPDM: 20 Years Old

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are a number of flat roofing systems available, some of which include EPDM (Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer), and Modbit (Modified Bitumen). While each has its advantages and disadvantages, these are two of the more common systems used in residential and commercial applications today.

Modified Bitumen is a common flat roofing system that consists of asphalt with added modifiers to give it a rubber-like quality. Modbit membrane rolls come in 36”-39” widths, and cover an area of approximately 100 square feet. Surfacings can include mineral granules, copper, aluminum, or aggregate. Modbit systems are usually one, two, or three-ply systems and are typically torch-applied. Installation costs are less than most single-ply systems on the market today. Modbit is available in a variety of colors, whereas EPDM is typically limited to black or white.

Since most modbit systems are torch-applied, the roofs may experience leaks when the proper moisture barrier is not installed underneath the coping cap on parapet walls. Other typical problems with this system include inadequate head laps and backwater laps which allow moisture infiltration. Effects of backwater laps are leaks and blisters which can lead to roof failure. Even cold-applied modbit systems can result in moisture infiltration as well as under application of adhesive which can result in poor lamination and roof leaks.

EPDM is a single-ply, flexible rubber roofing membrane that can easily be cut to size to fit any job. This system can either be full-cured prior to installation, or can be left to cure during natural weathering after installation. The most common application procedures include fully-adhered, mechanically-fastened, or loose-laid. The first method uses water-based adhesives to adhere the rubber to the substrate. The second method is attached by using manufacturer-approved mechanical means to the substrate. The third method involves securing the membranes only at the perimeters and any penetrations. EPDM roofing systems are usually sealed using adhesive or splice tape.

EPDM can be installed in a single piece, eliminating problems with parting joints and roof leakage. It also does not crack, peel, or split, and is resistant to atmospheric pollution. Its high percentage of elasticity allows it to stretch to over 300% to accommodate temperature change and building movement. The approximate life expectancy for an EPDM roofing system is around 20 years, with little to no maintenance required.

Both EPDM & Modified Bitumen offer benefits to the flat roofing industry. Modbit tends to be less expensive and offer more aesthetically appealing options, while EPDM is more environmentally friendly, easier to install, and tends to have a longer life cycle when installed correctly.

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SUPPLY PLUMBING ISSUES OR CONCERNS:

PHYSICAL DAMAGE AND WEAR/TEAR TO PLUMBING FEATURES:
Common physical damage (chips, cracks, rusting, loose/weak components, corrosion, etc.) at various plumbing features was discovered. The primary cause of these issues is likely due to common usage and material aging. At the time of inspection, the overall condition of plumbing features was not significantly affecting observed functionality. Repairs or replacement of plumbing features due to minor issues should take place on an as needed basis or per general maintenance guidelines. Plumbing component which have met their general life expectancy, and are exhibiting signs of reduced functionality/weakening, should be replaced prior to complete failure. Budgeting for future update needs is advised.

REPLACE DATED VALVES – MAINTENANCE RECOMMENDATION:
As a general maintenance recommendation, all dated supply fixture valves (located at sinks, commodes, laundry, water heater, etc.) should be updated and replaced every 10 years or as needed. As these valves age, the material becomes weak and is prone to damage/leakage. Replacement of dated valves would reduce the likelihood of future leaks and improve the system as a whole. At the time of inspection, no active valve leaks were discovered, however, most valves were not turned due to the current weakened material condition.

MAINTENANCE/REPAIR RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCERNS:
Areas of common flaws, adjustment needs, and/or general concern were discovered during the system assessment. Ensure all recommendations and concerns are professionally addressed as needed. Areas of concern noted at the time of inspection include, but are not limited to:
-Install anti-siphon devices at exterior hose bibs: Maintenance update (recommendation mandated by licensing body, minor issue/concern)
-General wear/tear and adjustment needs at plumbing fixtures: Loose connections at sink/counter top area, missing/loose handle hardware, etc.
-Seal enamel damage/rusting at guest tub: Preventative update to reduce ongoing damage
-Seal all wall gaps at tub/shower penetration points: Improved protection from moisture entry and damage
-Weak pressure observed at guest tub fixture: Adjust/replace fixture or address as needed (consult with plumber)
-Repair or replace master shower fixture: Leaks at shower head connection

DRAIN SIDE ISSUES OR CONCERNS:

CLEAN OUT ACCESS NOT DISCOVERED:
At the time of inspection, a clean out access port was not discovered. These access points (often located at front yard) allow for visual assessment of the primary drainage/sewage line and act as an access point for repairs. Consulting with the current owner is recommended to determine if a known access is present. Ensure any buried or covered clean out ports are accessible. If no clean out is present, one should be installed by a plumbing professional.
NOTE: Missing clean out ports reduce the visual inspection of the drain system.

FIXTURE DRAIN LEAKS DISCOVERED:
Leaks at fixture drains and traps were noted. These common drain leaks should be addressed to prevent moisture damage to surrounding material. Areas of drain leaks include, but are not limited to:
-Kitchen sink: Drain pipes separated/leaking
-Guest Bath sink: Drip leak at stopper connection

MAINTENANCE/REPAIR RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCERNS:
Areas of common flaws, adjustment needs, and/or general concern were discovered during the system assessment. Ensure all recommendations and concerns are professionally addressed as needed. Areas of concern noted at the time of inspection include, but are not limited to:
-Proper p-trap at master shower not verified (viewed from shower pan and with scoping camera): Further assessment required to verify proper trap
-Bellies and cast iron deterioration discovered during 3rd party pipe camera assessment (additional information will be made available in a separate 3rd party report document)

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CHAPTER 535 SUB-CHAPTER R (REAL ESTATE INSPECTORS): CLICK HERE

§535.222 Inspection Reports – Click Here
§535.223 Standard Inspection Report Form – Click Here
§535.224 Practice and Procedure – Click Here
§535.227 Standards of Practice: General Provisions – Click Here
§535.228 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Structural Systems  – Click Here
§535.229 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Electrical Systems – Click Here
§535.230 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems – Click Here
§535.231 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Plumbing Systems – Click Here
§535.232 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Appliances – Click Here
§535.233 Standards of Practice: Minimum Inspection Requirements for Optional Systems – Click Here

 

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Below are links to various maintenance guides, calendar uploads, referrals and tips.

STANDARD MAINTENANCE GUIDES AND ONLINE CALENDARS: CLICK HERE

LONG FORM MAINTENANCE GUIDES (FOR MAINTENANCE PROS): CLICK HERE

POOL/SPA MAINTENANCE GUIDES: CLICK HERE

DECK MAINTENANCE GUIDES: CLICK HERE

EMBED MAINTENANCE REMINDER INTO GOOGLE CALENDARS: CLICK HERE

A HOME OWNERS GUIDE TO MONITORING THE FOUNDATION: CLICK HERE

MAINTAINING SLAB FOUNDATIONS ON CLAY/EXPANSIVE SOILS: CLICK HERE

SEPTIC TANK INFORMATION: CLICK HERE

LOCAL TRADE REFERRALS: CLICK HERE

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2018
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Sewer Line Belly and Pipe Channeling Explained

Sewer Line Belly vs Pipe Channeling

What is a Sewer Line Belly?

A sewer line ‘belly’ is defined as a pipe holding water due to inadequate slope percentages at one or more sections of the lateral drain. A belly in a sewer line is often caused by geological events (soil movement/erosion), foundation settlement, inadequate soil compaction during installation, or a combination of various factors. Often, pipe bellies do not cause immediate or complete failure of the sewage system, however, bellies become problematic when/if debris collects and causes system blockage or backup.

What is Sewer Line Channeling?

Sewer line channeling occurs when running water cuts a course into the bottom of a sewer line over time (similar to the formation of a ravine, canyon or gully). In many cases, by the time a sewer line channel has become a problem, the bottom of the pipe may be in a state of failure. Failed or significantly deteriorated pipes (often discovered in dated cast iron drain pipes) provides an access point for tree roots, soil, and insects which typically lead to additional issues and complete drain line blockage.

Channeling in pipe. Pipe Rot.

What Are the Repair Options – Bellies?

Often, pipe bellies do not cause immediate or complete failure of the sewage system, however, bellies become problematic when/if debris collects and causes system blockage or backup. In most cases, it is not possible to determine if pipe settlement has stabilized or is ongoing. Due to this limitation, the possibility of increasing drainage flow disruption and future repair needs at seemingly inconsequential bellies/sags can not be ruled out. Professional opinion and repair/replacement recommendations to address pipe bellying will vary from one specialist to the next and is often decided on a case-by-case basis (primary repair option is pipe excavation and replacement).
Due to the inability of a home owner or maintenance specialist to regularly monitor portions of buried plumbing, a proactive approach to addressing sewage system issues is considered to be a best practice and proper preventative maintenance care.
Typically, recommendations to address pipe bellies are based on the degree of drainage disruption, the likelihood of increasing/future issues, and various additional factors relating to plumbing issues/concerns. Professional investigation by a plumbing and/or building science  specialist will likely be required to verify issues and determine what courses of action are available and warranted. 

What Are the Repair Options – Channeling?

Channeling is often associated with dated pipe material (cast iron). Professional opinion and repair/replacement recommendations to address pipe channeling will vary from one specialist to the next and is often decided on a case-by-case basis. The primary repair option is pipe excavation and replacement, however, in certain cases there may be alternative repair options (see link below). If channeling has occurred due to excess deterioration and failure of dated pipe material at multiple locations, full replacement of sewage piping and updating to PVC is likely the most feasible option.  

NOTICE OF 3RD PARTY PUBLISHED MATERIAL:
Portions of this post was originally published by Pipelining Technologies INC. Click HERE for links to published info.

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CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD MANUAL


This systems manual is a document meant to inform the homeowner, occupants, and/or property staff the basis for operating and maintaining the building’s mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems.  It is intended to be useful in the day-to-day operations of the property.  This document contains a brief overview of the systems, a detailed description each system along with operational information, and a comprehensive matrix of system components.  Following this document is a summary of recommended  maintenance procedures/practices that should be followed to extend the life of the installed products.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD MANUAL